Bob Mondello

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Halloween is tomorrow, and NPR's movie critic Bob Mondello knows all about creating and critiquing scary make-believe worlds. But reviewing high-budget Hollywood films got him thinking about the simpler frights he helped scare up in his first job.

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BOB MONDELLO, BYLINE: Yeah, yeah, it's a dark and stormy night. Road's washed out...

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UNIDENTIFIED ACTOR #1: (As character) Hello?

MONDELLO: ...Phone's gone dead...

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James Bond is back finally after six years and three pandemic-related delays. "No Time To Die" is the 25th official 007 film. It's the fifth and last to star Daniel Craig. So is it worth the wait? We asked critic Bob Mondello.

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Souls waiting to be selected for life on Earth sounds like a movie plot - right? - like a specific movie, in fact - Pixar's "Soul." Well, it's also the premise of "Nine Days," a live-action drama that was a hit at the Sundance Film Festival. Critic Bob Mondello says "Nine Days" took him a lot more than nine days to process.

After years marked by the hashtags #OscarsSoWhite and #OscarsSoMale, industry observers are crowing over this year's topline numbers. For the first time in Academy Awards history, almost half the nominees in the acting categories (9 of 20) are performers of color, and more women (70) are nominated throughout the 23 categories than in any previous year.

Oscar's box-office bounce this year is a resounding thud.

Most awards seasons find film fans seeking out Best Picture nominees in the run-up to the Academy Awards telecast, with the eventual winner reaping millions of additional dollars post-telecast.

ArcLight Cinemas and Pacific Theaters said late Monday they are ceasing operations, closing all of their roughly 300 screens mostly found in California.

None has inspired more distress among Hollywood notables than the Cinerama Dome on Hollywood's Sunset Boulevard.

"After shutting our doors more than a year ago," the company said in a statement, "today we must share the difficult and sad news that Pacific will not be reopening its ArcLight Cinemas and Pacific Theaters locations."

It's 8:45 a.m. on a weekday in Washington, D.C., and if anyone needs a reminder why the coronavirus vaccine is important, there's one arriving at the Takoma Metro stop: an almost empty train pulling up to an almost empty subway platform at the height of rush hour.

Jeff Bridges announced Monday night that he has a possibly life-threatening illness. He broke the news on Twitter with a reference to the iconically laid-back character with whom he's long been identified.

"As the Dude would say..New S**T has come to light," the 70-year-old actor tweeted. "I have been diagnosed with Lymphoma. Although it is a serious disease, I feel fortunate that I have a great team of doctors and the prognosis is good."

On the Beach, the 1959 film version of Nevil Shute's cataclysmic bestseller, kicks into gear with a newscast designed to transport 1950s movie audiences from the nuclear age into a post-nuclear age:

"Scientists disagree as to when radiation will reach Australia," intones the newscaster. "The atomic war has ended. But the prime minister reports no proof of survival of human life anywhere except here."

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Missing the magic of seeing a movie in the theater with a crowd - hardly the most pressing problem right now. Big-screen viewing is not an essential activity, not even for critic Bob Mondello, though he does miss it.

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It's been a decade since celebrity pals Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon had their dueling impressions of Michael Caine go viral in the movie "The Trip."

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For the first time in more than a month, a handful of U.S. movie theaters is screening films for the public. It's a toe-dip, not a dive. Santikos Entertainment in San Antonio opened three of its nine Texas cineplexes with masks and social distancing protocols in place this past Saturday. Two days later, EVO Entertainment did the same with two of its Texas theaters.

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